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2007 Minnesota Statutes

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245.4871 DEFINITIONS.
    Subdivision 1. Definitions. The definitions in this section apply to sections 245.487 to
245.4889.
    Subd. 2. Acute care hospital inpatient treatment. "Acute care hospital inpatient treatment"
means short-term medical, nursing, and psychosocial services provided in an acute care hospital
licensed under chapter 144.
    Subd. 3. Case management services. "Case management services" means activities that are
coordinated with the family community support services and are designed to help the child with
severe emotional disturbance and the child's family obtain needed mental health services, social
services, educational services, health services, vocational services, recreational services, and
related services in the areas of volunteer services, advocacy, transportation, and legal services.
Case management services include assisting in obtaining a comprehensive diagnostic assessment,
if needed, developing a functional assessment, developing an individual family community
support plan, and assisting the child and the child's family in obtaining needed services by
coordination with other agencies and assuring continuity of care. Case managers must assess and
reassess the delivery, appropriateness, and effectiveness of services over time.
    Subd. 4. Case management service provider. (a) "Case management service provider"
means a case manager or case manager associate employed by the county or other entity
authorized by the county board to provide case management services specified in subdivision 3
for the child with severe emotional disturbance and the child's family.
(b) A case manager must:
(1) have experience and training in working with children;
(2) have at least a bachelor's degree in one of the behavioral sciences or a related field
including, but not limited to, social work, psychology, or nursing from an accredited college or
university or meet the requirements of paragraph (d);
(3) have experience and training in identifying and assessing a wide range of children's needs;
(4) be knowledgeable about local community resources and how to use those resources for
the benefit of children and their families; and
(5) meet the supervision and continuing education requirements of paragraphs (e), (f), and
(g), as applicable.
(c) A case manager may be a member of any professional discipline that is part of the local
system of care for children established by the county board.
(d) A case manager without a bachelor's degree must meet one of the requirements in clauses
(1) to (3):
(1) have three or four years of experience as a case manager associate;
(2) be a registered nurse without a bachelor's degree who has a combination of specialized
training in psychiatry and work experience consisting of community interaction and involvement
or community discharge planning in a mental health setting totaling three years; or
(3) be a person who qualified as a case manager under the 1998 Department of Human
Services waiver provision and meets the continuing education, supervision, and mentoring
requirements in this section.
(e) A case manager with at least 2,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery
of mental health services to children must receive regular ongoing supervision and clinical
supervision totaling 38 hours per year, of which at least one hour per month must be clinical
supervision regarding individual service delivery with a case management supervisor. The other
26 hours of supervision may be provided by a case manager with two years of experience. Group
supervision may not constitute more than one-half of the required supervision hours.
(f) A case manager without 2,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery of mental
health services to children with emotional disturbance must:
(1) begin 40 hours of training approved by the commissioner of human services in case
management skills and in the characteristics and needs of children with severe emotional
disturbance before beginning to provide case management services; and
(2) receive clinical supervision regarding individual service delivery from a mental health
professional at least one hour each week until the requirement of 2,000 hours of experience is met.
(g) A case manager who is not licensed, registered, or certified by a health-related licensing
board must receive 30 hours of continuing education and training in severe emotional disturbance
and mental health services every two years.
(h) Clinical supervision must be documented in the child's record. When the case manager is
not a mental health professional, the county board must provide or contract for needed clinical
supervision.
(i) The county board must ensure that the case manager has the freedom to access and
coordinate the services within the local system of care that are needed by the child.
(j) A case manager associate (CMA) must:
(1) work under the direction of a case manager or case management supervisor;
(2) be at least 21 years of age;
(3) have at least a high school diploma or its equivalent; and
(4) meet one of the following criteria:
(i) have an associate of arts degree in one of the behavioral sciences or human services;
(ii) be a registered nurse without a bachelor's degree;
(iii) have three years of life experience as a primary caregiver to a child with serious
emotional disturbance as defined in section 245.4871, subdivision 6, within the previous ten years;
(iv) have 6,000 hours work experience as a nondegreed state hospital technician; or
(v) be a mental health practitioner as defined in subdivision 26, clause (2).
Individuals meeting one of the criteria in items (i) to (iv) may qualify as a case manager after
four years of supervised work experience as a case manager associate. Individuals meeting the
criteria in item (v) may qualify as a case manager after three years of supervised experience as
a case manager associate.
(k) Case manager associates must meet the following supervision, mentoring, and continuing
education requirements;
(1) have 40 hours of preservice training described under paragraph (f), clause (1);
(2) receive at least 40 hours of continuing education in severe emotional disturbance and
mental health service annually; and
(3) receive at least five hours of mentoring per week from a case management mentor. A
"case management mentor" means a qualified, practicing case manager or case management
supervisor who teaches or advises and provides intensive training and clinical supervision to
one or more case manager associates. Mentoring may occur while providing direct services to
consumers in the office or in the field and may be provided to individuals or groups of case
manager associates. At least two mentoring hours per week must be individual and face-to-face.
(l) A case management supervisor must meet the criteria for a mental health professional as
specified in section 245.4871, subdivision 27.
(m) An immigrant who does not have the qualifications specified in this subdivision may
provide case management services to child immigrants with severe emotional disturbance of the
same ethnic group as the immigrant if the person:
(1) is currently enrolled in and is actively pursuing credits toward the completion of a
bachelor's degree in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields at an accredited college or
university;
(2) completes 40 hours of training as specified in this subdivision; and
(3) receives clinical supervision at least once a week until the requirements of obtaining a
bachelor's degree and 2,000 hours of supervised experience are met.
    Subd. 5. Child. "Child" means a person under 18 years of age.
    Subd. 6. Child with severe emotional disturbance. For purposes of eligibility for case
management and family community support services, "child with severe emotional disturbance"
means a child who has an emotional disturbance and who meets one of the following criteria:
(1) the child has been admitted within the last three years or is at risk of being admitted to
inpatient treatment or residential treatment for an emotional disturbance; or
(2) the child is a Minnesota resident and is receiving inpatient treatment or residential
treatment for an emotional disturbance through the interstate compact; or
(3) the child has one of the following as determined by a mental health professional:
(i) psychosis or a clinical depression; or
(ii) risk of harming self or others as a result of an emotional disturbance; or
(iii) psychopathological symptoms as a result of being a victim of physical or sexual abuse
or of psychic trauma within the past year; or
(4) the child, as a result of an emotional disturbance, has significantly impaired home,
school, or community functioning that has lasted at least one year or that, in the written opinion of
a mental health professional, presents substantial risk of lasting at least one year.
The term "child with severe emotional disturbance" shall be used only for purposes of
county eligibility determinations. In all other written and oral communications, case managers,
mental health professionals, mental health practitioners, and all other providers of mental health
services shall use the term "child eligible for mental health case management" in place of "child
with severe emotional disturbance."
    Subd. 7. Clinical supervision. "Clinical supervision" means the oversight responsibility for
individual treatment plans and individual mental health service delivery, including that provided
by the case manager. Clinical supervision does not include authority to make or terminate
court-ordered placements of the child. Clinical supervision must be accomplished by full-time
or part-time employment of or contracts with mental health professionals. The mental health
professional must document the clinical supervision by cosigning individual treatment plans and
by making entries in the client's record on supervisory activities.
    Subd. 8. Commissioner. "Commissioner" means the commissioner of human services.
    Subd. 9. County board. "County board" means the county board of commissioners or
board established under the Joint Powers Act, section 471.59, or the Human Services Act,
sections 402.01 to 402.10.
    Subd. 9a. Crisis assistance. "Crisis assistance" means assistance to the child, the child's
family, and all providers of services to the child to: recognize factors precipitating a mental health
crisis, identify behaviors related to the crisis, and be informed of available resources to resolve
the crisis. Crisis assistance requires the development of a plan which addresses prevention and
intervention strategies to be used in a potential crisis. Other interventions include: (1) arranging
for admission to acute care hospital inpatient treatment; (2) crisis placement; (3) community
resources for follow-up; and (4) emotional support to the family during crisis. Crisis assistance
does not include services designed to secure the safety of a child who is at risk of abuse or neglect
or necessary emergency services.
    Subd. 10. Day treatment services. "Day treatment," "day treatment services," or "day
treatment program" means a structured program of treatment and care provided to a child in:
(1) an outpatient hospital accredited by the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health
Organizations and licensed under sections 144.50 to 144.55;
(2) a community mental health center under section 245.62;
(3) an entity that is under contract with the county board to operate a program that meets
the requirements of section 245.4884, subdivision 2, and Minnesota Rules, parts 9505.0170 to
9505.0475; or
(4) an entity that operates a program that meets the requirements of section 245.4884,
subdivision 2
, and Minnesota Rules, parts 9505.0170 to 9505.0475, that is under contract with an
entity that is under contract with a county board.
Day treatment consists of group psychotherapy and other intensive therapeutic services
that are provided for a minimum three-hour time block by a multidisciplinary staff under the
clinical supervision of a mental health professional. Day treatment may include education
and consultation provided to families and other individuals as an extension of the treatment
process. The services are aimed at stabilizing the child's mental health status, and developing and
improving the child's daily independent living and socialization skills. Day treatment services are
distinguished from day care by their structured therapeutic program of psychotherapy services.
Day treatment services are not a part of inpatient hospital or residential treatment services. Day
treatment services for a child are an integrated set of education, therapy, and family interventions.
A day treatment service must be available to a child at least five days a week throughout
the year and must be coordinated with, integrated with, or part of an education program offered
by the child's school.
    Subd. 11. Diagnostic assessment. "Diagnostic assessment" means a written evaluation
by a mental health professional of:
(1) a child's current life situation and sources of stress, including reasons for referral;
(2) the history of the child's current mental health problem or problems, including important
developmental incidents, strengths, and vulnerabilities;
(3) the child's current functioning and symptoms;
(4) the child's diagnosis including a determination of whether the child meets the criteria of
severely emotionally disturbed as specified in subdivision 6; and
(5) the mental health services needed by the child.
    Subd. 12. Mental health identification and intervention services. "Mental health
identification and intervention services" means services that are designed to identify children
who are at risk of needing or who need mental health services and that arrange for intervention
and treatment.
    Subd. 13. Education and prevention services. (a) "Education and prevention services"
means services designed to:
(1) educate the general public and groups identified as at risk of developing emotional
disturbance under section 245.4872, subdivision 3;
(2) increase the understanding and acceptance of problems associated with emotional
disturbances;
(3) improve people's skills in dealing with high-risk situations known to affect children's
mental health and functioning; and
(4) refer specific children or their families with mental health needs to mental health services.
(b) The services include distribution to individuals and agencies identified by the county
board and the local children's mental health advisory council of information on predictors and
symptoms of emotional disturbances, where mental health services are available in the county,
and how to access the services.
    Subd. 14. Emergency services. "Emergency services" means an immediate response service
available on a 24-hour, seven-day-a-week basis for each child having a psychiatric crisis, a mental
health crisis, or a mental health emergency.
    Subd. 15. Emotional disturbance. "Emotional disturbance" means an organic disorder of
the brain or a clinically significant disorder of thought, mood, perception, orientation, memory,
or behavior that:
(1) is listed in the clinical manual of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM),
current edition, code range 290.0 to 302.99 or 306.0 to 316.0 or the corresponding code in the
American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
(DSM-MD), current edition, Axes I, II, or III; and
(2) seriously limits a child's capacity to function in primary aspects of daily living such as
personal relations, living arrangements, work, school, and recreation.
"Emotional disturbance" is a generic term and is intended to reflect all categories of disorder
described in DSM-MD, current edition as "usually first evident in childhood or adolescence."
    Subd. 16. Family. "Family" means a child and one or more of the following persons whose
participation is necessary to accomplish the child's treatment goals: (1) a person related to the
child by blood, marriage, or adoption; (2) a person who is the child's foster parent or significant
other; (3) a person who is the child's legal representative.
    Subd. 17. Family community support services. "Family community support services"
means services provided under the clinical supervision of a mental health professional and
designed to help each child with severe emotional disturbance to function and remain with the
child's family in the community. Family community support services do not include acute care
hospital inpatient treatment, residential treatment services, or regional treatment center services.
Family community support services include:
(1) client outreach to each child with severe emotional disturbance and the child's family;
(2) medication monitoring where necessary;
(3) assistance in developing independent living skills;
(4) assistance in developing parenting skills necessary to address the needs of the child
with severe emotional disturbance;
(5) assistance with leisure and recreational activities;
(6) crisis assistance, including crisis placement and respite care;
(7) professional home-based family treatment;
(8) foster care with therapeutic supports;
(9) day treatment;
(10) assistance in locating respite care and special needs day care; and
(11) assistance in obtaining potential financial resources, including those benefits listed
in section 245.4884, subdivision 5.
    Subd. 18. Functional assessment. "Functional assessment" means an assessment by the
case manager of the child's:
(1) mental health symptoms as presented in the child's diagnostic assessment;
(2) mental health needs as presented in the child's diagnostic assessment;
(3) use of drugs and alcohol;
(4) vocational and educational functioning;
(5) social functioning, including the use of leisure time;
(6) interpersonal functioning, including relationships with the child's family;
(7) self-care and independent living capacity;
(8) medical and dental health;
(9) financial assistance needs;
(10) housing and transportation needs; and
(11) other needs and problems.
    Subd. 19. Individual family community support plan. "Individual family community
support plan" means a written plan developed by a case manager in conjunction with the family
and the child with severe emotional disturbance on the basis of a diagnostic assessment and a
functional assessment. The plan identifies specific services needed by a child and the child's
family to:
(1) treat the symptoms and dysfunctions determined in the diagnostic assessment;
(2) relieve conditions leading to emotional disturbance and improve the personal well-being
of the child;
(3) improve family functioning;
(4) enhance daily living skills;
(5) improve functioning in education and recreation settings;
(6) improve interpersonal and family relationships;
(7) enhance vocational development; and
(8) assist in obtaining transportation, housing, health services, and employment.
    Subd. 20. Individual placement agreement. "Individual placement agreement" means a
written agreement or supplement to a service contract entered into between the county board and
a service provider on behalf of a child to provide residential treatment services.
    Subd. 21. Individual treatment plan. "Individual treatment plan" means a written plan of
intervention, treatment, and services for a child with an emotional disturbance that is developed by
a service provider under the clinical supervision of a mental health professional on the basis of a
diagnostic assessment. An individual treatment plan for a child must be developed in conjunction
with the family unless clinically inappropriate. The plan identifies goals and objectives of
treatment, treatment strategy, a schedule for accomplishing treatment goals and objectives, and
the individuals responsible for providing treatment to the child with an emotional disturbance.
    Subd. 22. Legal representative. "Legal representative" means a guardian, conservator, or
guardian ad litem of a child with an emotional disturbance authorized by the court to make
decisions about mental health services for the child.
    Subd. 23.[Repealed, 1991 c 94 s 25]
    Subd. 24. Local system of care. "Local system of care" means services that are locally
available to the child and the child's family. The services are mental health, social services,
correctional services, education services, health services, and vocational services.
    Subd. 24a. Mental health crisis services. "Mental health crisis services" means crisis
assessment, crisis intervention, and crisis stabilization services.
    Subd. 25. Mental health funds. "Mental health funds" are funds expended under sections
245.73 and 256E.12, federal mental health block grant funds, and funds expended under section
256D.06 to facilities licensed under Minnesota Rules, parts 9520.0500 to 9520.0690.
    Subd. 26. Mental health practitioner. "Mental health practitioner" means a person
providing services to children with emotional disturbances. A mental health practitioner must
have training and experience in working with children. A mental health practitioner must be
qualified in at least one of the following ways:
(1) holds a bachelor's degree in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields from an
accredited college or university and:
(i) has at least 2,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery of mental health services
to children with emotional disturbances; or
(ii) is fluent in the non-English language of the ethnic group to which at least 50 percent of the
practitioner's clients belong, completes 40 hours of training in the delivery of services to children
with emotional disturbances, and receives clinical supervision from a mental health professional
at least once a week until the requirement of 2,000 hours of supervised experience is met;
(2) has at least 6,000 hours of supervised experience in the delivery of mental health services
to children with emotional disturbances;
(3) is a graduate student in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields and is formally
assigned by an accredited college or university to an agency or facility for clinical training; or
(4) holds a master's or other graduate degree in one of the behavioral sciences or related
fields from an accredited college or university and has less than 4,000 hours post-master's
experience in the treatment of emotional disturbance.
    Subd. 27. Mental health professional. "Mental health professional" means a person
providing clinical services in the diagnosis and treatment of children's emotional disorders.
A mental health professional must have training and experience in working with children
consistent with the age group to which the mental health professional is assigned. A mental health
professional must be qualified in at least one of the following ways:
(1) in psychiatric nursing, the mental health professional must be a registered nurse who is
licensed under sections 148.171 to 148.285 and who is certified as a clinical specialist in child
and adolescent psychiatric or mental health nursing by a national nurse certification organization
or who has a master's degree in nursing or one of the behavioral sciences or related fields from
an accredited college or university or its equivalent, with at least 4,000 hours of post-master's
supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental illness;
(2) in clinical social work, the mental health professional must be a person licensed as an
independent clinical social worker under chapter 148D, or a person with a master's degree in
social work from an accredited college or university, with at least 4,000 hours of post-master's
supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental disorders;
(3) in psychology, the mental health professional must be an individual licensed by the
board of psychology under sections 148.88 to 148.98 who has stated to the board of psychology
competencies in the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders;
(4) in psychiatry, the mental health professional must be a physician licensed under chapter
147 and certified by the American board of psychiatry and neurology or eligible for board
certification in psychiatry;
(5) in marriage and family therapy, the mental health professional must be a marriage
and family therapist licensed under sections 148B.29 to 148B.39 with at least two years of
post-master's supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services in the treatment of mental
disorders or emotional disturbances; or
(6) in allied fields, the mental health professional must be a person with a master's degree
from an accredited college or university in one of the behavioral sciences or related fields, with
at least 4,000 hours of post-master's supervised experience in the delivery of clinical services
in the treatment of emotional disturbances.
    Subd. 28. Mental health services. "Mental health services" means at least all of the
treatment services and case management activities that are provided to children with emotional
disturbances and are described in sections 245.487 to 245.4889.
    Subd. 29. Outpatient services. "Outpatient services" means mental health services,
excluding day treatment and community support services programs, provided by or under the
clinical supervision of a mental health professional to children with emotional disturbances
who live outside a hospital. Outpatient services include clinical activities such as individual,
group, and family therapy; individual treatment planning; diagnostic assessments; medication
management; and psychological testing.
    Subd. 30. Parent. "Parent" means the birth or adoptive mother or father of a child. This
definition does not apply to a person whose parental rights have been terminated in relation to
the child.
    Subd. 31. Professional home-based family treatment. "Professional home-based family
treatment" means intensive mental health services provided to children because of an emotional
disturbance (1) who are at risk of out-of-home placement; (2) who are in out-of-home placement;
or (3) who are returning from out-of-home placement. Services are provided to the child and the
child's family primarily in the child's home environment. Services may also be provided in the
child's school, child care setting, or other community setting appropriate to the child. Services
must be provided on an individual family basis, must be child-oriented and family-oriented, and
must be designed using information from diagnostic and functional assessments to meet the
specific mental health needs of the child and the child's family. Examples of services are: (1)
individual therapy; (2) family therapy; (3) client outreach; (4) assistance in developing individual
living skills; (5) assistance in developing parenting skills necessary to address the needs of the
child; (6) assistance with leisure and recreational services; (7) crisis assistance, including crisis
respite care and arranging for crisis placement; and (8) assistance in locating respite and child
care. Services must be coordinated with other services provided to the child and family.
    Subd. 32. Residential treatment. "Residential treatment" means a 24-hour-a-day program
under the clinical supervision of a mental health professional, in a community residential setting
other than an acute care hospital or regional treatment center inpatient unit, that must be licensed
as a residential treatment program for children with emotional disturbances under Minnesota
Rules, parts 9545.0900 to 9545.1090, or other rules adopted by the commissioner.
    Subd. 33. Service provider. "Service provider" means either a county board or an individual
or agency including a regional treatment center under contract with the county board that provides
children's mental health services funded under sections 245.487 to 245.4889.
    Subd. 33a. Culturally informed mental health consultant. "Culturally informed mental
health consultant" is a person who is recognized by the culture as one who has knowledge of a
particular culture and its definition of health and mental health; and who is used as necessary to
assist the county board and its mental health providers in assessing and providing appropriate
mental health services for children from that particular cultural, linguistic, or racial heritage
and their families.
    Subd. 34. Therapeutic support of foster care. "Therapeutic support of foster care" means
the mental health training and mental health support services and clinical supervision provided
by a mental health professional to foster families caring for children with severe emotional
disturbance to provide a therapeutic family environment and support for the child's improved
functioning.
    Subd. 35. Transition services. "Transition services" means mental health services, designed
within an outcome oriented process that promotes movement from school to postschool activities,
including postsecondary education, vocational training, integrated employment including
supported employment, continuing and adult education, adult mental health and social services,
other adult services, independent living, or community participation.
History: 1989 c 282 art 4 s 38; 1990 c 568 art 5 s 11,34; 1991 c 292 art 6 s 13-15,58 subd
1; 1992 c 526 s 2; 1992 c 571 art 10 s 11; 1993 c 339 s 3; 1Sp1993 c 1 art 7 s 8; 1995 c 207
art 8 s 2-4; 1996 c 451 art 5 s 5; 1998 c 407 art 4 s 4; 1999 c 86 art 1 s 57; 1999 c 159 s 30;
1999 c 172 s 16; 1999 c 245 art 5 s 6,7; 2000 c 474 s 4; 2000 c 499 s 33; 1Sp2001 c 9 art 9 s
10-12; 2002 c 375 art 2 s 6; 2002 c 379 art 1 s 113; 1Sp2003 c 14 art 11 s 11; 2005 c 147 art 1 s
66; 2007 c 147 art 8 s 38

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